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Tow Expo Dallas
Dallas, TX.
August 17-19, 2017
AT Exposition
Baltimore, MD.
Nov. 17-19, 2017
AT ShowPlace
Las Vegas, NV.
May 9-11, 2018
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Join Mike Stevens of AAA Texas for foundational training on lockout basics with a focus on damage prevention. Topics include: basic lockout guidelines, discussion of locking mechanisms, safety around airbags and more. It will take place as part of the Towing & Recovery Conference taking place at Tow Expo Dallas, August 17-19, 2017 at the Gaylord Texan Resort in Grapevine, Texas.

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American Towman Magazine Presents the Week in TowingAugust 16 - August 22, 2017

City, State
RATES
North:
Bronx, NY
$125
(Pop. 1,438,159)
South:
Charlotte, NC
$85
(Pop. 809,958)
East:
Baltimore, MD
$85
(Pop. 622,104)
West:
San Jose, CA
$200
(Pop. 1,015,785)
Light-Duty nonconsensual tow rates as provided by Police Towers of America.
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When Lightning Strikes

e fb94dBy Randall C. Resch

Have you ever heard the safety phrase, "When thunder roars, go indoors?" It's a catchy ditty, but unfortunately we towmen respond to calls 24/7 regardless of weather or time of day.

Electrical shock ain't no laughing matter. Lightning—one of Mother Nature's extreme weather conditions—is capable of great bodily injury and death; strikes occur everywhere and oftentimes without notice.

Much of our work demands that we work outdoors during heavy rain and hailstorms, so there's a good chance that we'll have to face a lightning bolt that's moving faster than the speed of sound.

The Great Killer

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, lightning strike fatalities are the second greatest storm killer in the United States (flooding being No. 1). In extreme weather, it's recommended that you listen to local weather stations to know what is headed your way; especially where tornadoes are prevalent.

Weather changes quickly, and the best prevention is to be prepared. When storms start to roll in, stop the activity and take cover until the thunder, downpour, or hail stops.

There's not much known about the exact moment when or if lightning will strike; however, there are a few safety considerations to consider. Your life may depend on how you react to severe storms and lightning activity.

NOAA recommends that if you hear loud and close thunder, retreat to a safe, enclosed and heavily constructed location such as a house, school, store or offices. If a structure isn't close, the second safest location would be to climb into your tow truck or wrecker, keeping the windows up and doors closed.

If a lightning strike is probable, stay in the safe location for 30 minutes or more after hearing the last clap of thunder. Lightning tends to linger, so keep in mind that another strike may be forthcoming.

Avoid locations and activities that invite the most risk, such as elevated places and tall isolated objects. Don't retreat under trees to try and keep dry, stay low, and refrain from working water recoveries or standing in pooling water. Do not carry metal objects, even with gloved hands, including holding winch cables.

Although nearly impossible for the kind of work we do, try to keep dry; a full-sized rain suit will not protect you in a lightning strike.

When calls for service take you into the great outdoors, be smart when the presence of lightning is dangerously close and find that safe zone to ride out the storm. If you've got any doubt that lightning still lingers, stay safe inside and wait it out.

Randall Resch is American Towman's and Tow Industry Week's Operations Editor, a former California police officer, tow business owner and retired civilian off-road instructor for Navy Special Warfare. Randall is an approved instructor for towers serving the California Highway Patrol's rotation contract. His course is approved by the California law enforcement community. He has written over 500 industry-related articles for print and on-line, and is a member of the International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame.
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Safe Towing Capacity Made Easy

AAEAAQAAAAAAAAUgAAAAJDlkZjBjNTVjLTVjYjAtNDgwZS05Y2FmLWRlNzdmMWY4YWVhMA a2953By Randall C. Resch

American Towman's Field Editor Terry Abejuela recently wrote an informative safety article, "How to Determine Safe Towing Capacity." Terry's narrative was dead-on accurate; but, some towers can't grasp the mathematical process necessary to understand it.

I'd like to coat-tail Terry's article and share an easy way to first remember the formula, and secondly how to apply the formula's components and ease into appropriate calculations. Let's look at it from another perspective.

For us towmen with non-mathematical minds, learning to calculate the STC formula is sometimes an intimidating task where it might be easier to bypass weight calculations by simply loading or towing the vehicle. When something's too hard, it's characteristic to ignore the proper process and take a chance.

An overloaded tow truck or carrier is an accident waiting to happen and a leading cause of tow truck crashes. When tow trucks or carriers are overloaded, two systems are immediately affected where they can't brake cleanly or steer. In the event of panic stop at an intersection, tow vehicles sometimes lose their ability to stop due to disproportionate weight over the tow truck's rear-axle and limited weight on its front axle.

Combined with a lightened front steering axle, the tow truck isn't able to steer in the path it's intended to go. Combine no brakes and no steering with other bad driving behaviors like driving at a too-fast speed, existing road conditions and distracted drivers, the end result is typically uncontrollable and deadly.

Take the Call

When calls come to the dispatch office, it's the dispatcher's job to accept calls and assign it to the next available driver and appropriate truck. But--can the responding tow truck or carrier safely handle the heavier weight and configuration of the vehicle or item(s) being towed or transported?

When tow operators call their dispatchers and say, "Hey, I think this thing's too heavy for my truck," here's where tow company liability becomes paramount. Many towmen have that solid gut feeling that they know they're overloaded. The problem? Owners, managers or dispatchers simply poo-poo the tower's premonition of danger, order them to take the tow and quit whining.

If your driver calls to tell you they're overloaded, you'd best heed their warning and consider other options.

It's All Routine

Towmen are not mathematicians. Calculating STC can be confusing; but, the simplicity of knowing the formula is likened to conducting a typical tow truck inspection. By starting the inspection at the front of the truck, then moving to the center and finally to the rear of the truck. Put this little memorable ditty into your inspection routine: front, center, rear.

If you routinely inspect your truck starting at the front, to center, and then to the rear; remembering how to calculate the formula of safe towing capacity is the same. It is the same as the industry standard below:

Example: The formula, 1/2 FAW x WB divided by OH, asks:

1. (Front) What is one-half the front-axle's weight (1/2 FAW)?

2. (Center) What is the wheelbase (WB) measurement?

3. (Rear) What is the overhang (OH) measurement?

I teach this process to towers, police officers and military personnel in my challenge to make learning the formula less confusing and memorable. By routinely making tow truck inspections the same thought process as how to calculate safe tow capacity, towmen can easily and accurately determine if their load is safe and doable.

By training your mind to recognize the similarity between the two processes, determining STC becomes an easier process. For safety's sake, we're hoping that towers look to safety by calculating STC for the load or vehicle they're dispatched to handle. By chanting, "front, center, rear" repeatedly, remembering the components and process to determine STC is easy. Learn it, chant it, apply it.

And, when you're at the next tow truck inspection, you can almost put it to-a-tune as you sing it to the tow boss.

Randall Resch is American Towman's and Tow Industry Week's Operations Editor, a former California police officer, tow business owner and retired civilian off-road instructor for Navy Special Warfare. Randall is an approved instructor for towers serving the California Highway Patrol's rotation contract. His course is approved by the California law enforcement community. He has written over 500 industry-related articles for print and on-line, and is a member of the International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame.
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