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Janeway Towing rescues 40,000+-lbs. paver
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Gruesome Discovery in Towed Van

When Jay Senior pulled his tow truck back into the yard at Early’s in Worcester, Massachusetts, to unload an abandoned blue Chevy van he was moving from a few blocks down the road, he got out to see something unusual.

“I got out and about 300 flies came out” of the van, Senior said, explaining there was a hand-sized vent on the roof of the van. “The amount of flies in the van was unbelievable. The front windshield was covered.”

As the flies cleared the van, Senior smelled something rancid. He called Worcester police, who discovered there was a body inside the van.

Sources say the body was male and was stuffed inside a plastic container.

When the first officer got to the scene, he could tell there was something wrong, Senior said.

There were two plastic containers inside the van, according to Senior. One was sealed and the other contained tools, he said, adding that there were other items, including gas cans, in the vehicle.

Worcester police have described the death as suspicious. Marlborough police confirmed that the van was reported stolen in that city on May 7.

The couple who owns the van told a TV reporter they lent the van to a friend who then “disappeared.”

“I just hope it’s not him,” the owner said.

Source masslive.com.
Las Vegas Demo Highlights Century Rotator Uprighting Garbage Truck by Miller Industries

Northbound & Down

0 2ec9cby Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

On May 21, 2019, I was driving a box truck and was stuck in what seemed like an endless line of traffic backed up on I-287 northbound. I was heading north to the New York Thruway.

As traffic slowly moved along, I could see the silhouette of the extended boom of a rotator and an overturned tractor-trailer on its side. The boom proudly stated Big Tow Inc.—a familiar sight on the roads of northern New Jersey and Orange County, New York.

As soon as I drove the box truck back to my buddy’s yard, I reached out for two of Big Tow’s operators and owner/SVP Monika Fijor.

Husband and wife Ricardo and Monika Fijor are the dynamic duo and driving force of Big Tows Inc., founded in 1998 in Spring Valley, New York. They have an additional location in Ramsey, New Jersey.

“The original call was for road service at the Pilot Truck Stop on Route 17 South in Mahwah, New Jersey,” Monika said. “The truck had an accelerator pedal issue and the driver was limping his truck into the truck stop. The second call was that the truck just took off and the driver could not gain control overturning around 287 mile marker 67 at the flyover ramp.”

Ricardo was the recovery supervisor and operated the 2018 Peterbilt 389 twin-steer/Century 75-ton rotator. Monika handled scene documentation and oversaw needed equipment. Their son Dylan provided manual labor with rigging, cleanup and organizing all rigging back to its location.

Heavy operator Jeremy Honey handled the 2015 Peterbilt 389/50-ton rotator; Louis Quintuna worked the 2017 Peterbilt 389/Vulcan V-100 50-ton heavy and the 2016 John Deere excavator G75; Kevin Shapirro handled the 2019 Hino flatbed and roll-off containers; Santiago Paunta operated the 2010 Freightliner Sprinter support vehicle and cut guardrails, fencing and pieces off the trailer to make it road worthy and safe for transport; Nikolas Bouzeas handled the excavator and the 2015 Bobcat skid-steer; and Josue Gonzales provided manual labor.

“The tractor-trailer overturned to its right side coming to a stop on its roof. The cargo was crates of 2-liter bottles of Coca-Cola,” Monika said. “The tractor sustained heavy damage to its roof and right side. There was no fuel leaked, only oil from engine. Fuel tanks were about half full.

“The trailer sidewall and roof blew out,” she said, “spilling cargo down into the embankment; most of the cargo exploded making a sweet, sticky and muddy recovery. The front corner of the trailer was the only part holding the trailer from continuing down the embankment.”

Ricardo boomed the 75-ton over the front and rigged the tractor only to separate it from trailer and upright. He also ran the drag winch to the tandems to hold the trailer from coming free and dropping down further. Honey parked the 50-ton in front of the tractor and rigged to upright.

Gonzalez worked and freed the jaws of the fifth-wheel. Quintuna and Paunta cut the guardrail and fence, used the excavator to pull posts and clear a path to recover the trailer. The tractor was lifted and uprighted with care to avoid further damage or fuel spill.

After it was uprighted, the tractor was prepared and transported back to Big Tows garage in Ramsey. With the tractor out of the way, Honey hooked the 50-ton up to the front of the trailer and Ricardo hooked the 75-ton up to the rear of the trailer. Working together, both wreckers brought the trailer back to the pavement to be uprighted.

After it was uprighted, the pieces hanging were cut off and the rest strapped and secured for transport back to their shop in Ramsey. The trailer was transported by Honey using his 50-ton rotator.

“The cargo was badly damaged, dirty with mud and more then 3/4 of the load exploded [or was] leaking,” Monika said. “We used two excavators to pick from the hill and put on roadway and the Bobcat to scoop and put into containers for disposal. Where excavators would not reach it took manual labor and muscle from our crew to pick up and put the load where excavators could transfer it to the roadway.”

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Changing Expectations

So far this spring and into early summer, the weather in many areas across the country has been cooler than normal and definitely much wetter.

This can change the typical summer break heat-related calls of stranded motorists due to overworked batteries, cooling systems, etc.

It’s like having a winter with few snowstorms of note—what calls you normally get, and plan for, just aren’t happening.

Maybe that means you should reconsider the number of drivers on call vs. in service, or truck types you may have on the road, or adjusting some of the equipment stocked in truck toolboxes.

Are you changing your expectations of what your “normal” calls are to effectively respond to the shifting types and/or volume of calls for service?

—Brendan Dooley
TIW Managing Editor

--Charles Duke

Matjack Jumbo Cushions

MatJack b5918Recovery personnel worldwide look to Matjack’s Jumbo Turbo Safelift cushions when it comes to uprighting overturned tractor/trailers, aircraft recovery or any recovery which requires quality, heavy-duty air cushions and equipment. Matjack’s Jumbos come in both sloped and flat top design and in complete sets or individually. Come see what Matjack has to offer at Tow Expo-Dallas, August 15-17, at the Gaylord Texan Convention Center and Resort in Grapevine, Texas.

www.Matjack.com
By Don Lomax
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Editor: Charles Duke
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American Towman Wire • 06-18-2019
Chase Middlebrooks. Kalb.com image.

Man Arrested for Breaking into Towyard

An Evergreen, Louisiana, man was arrested for an outstanding warrant and trespassing into a towing yard. An Acadia Parish deputy conducted a traffic stop on a gray pickup truck after it passed several vehicles in a no-passing zone. The driver, Chase A. Middlebrooks, 35, had an outstanding warrant for contempt of court-failure to appear. He was arrested on the warrant and cited for passing in a no passing zone, no driver’s license on person, and no proof of insurance. His vehicle was towed from the location. The next day Middlebrooks was released; around 10:30 a.m. that day, sheriff’s received a call from the towing company that a trespasser was trying to remove items from a vehicle on the property. Upon arrival, deputies discovered that Middlebrooks had crawled under a gate at the towing yard, broken a window on his vehicle, and was removing items from his vehicle when confronted by the property owner. He was arrested for criminal trespass and unauthorized entry of a place of business. Source: kalb.com.

Chicago Impound Practices Under Fire

The city of Chicago, Illinois, was accused this week of “towing without telling;” towing and impounding thousands of vehicles without sending motorists the state-required notice by mail that their vehicles may be sold for scrap if not reclaimed. “Thousands of cars are, in effect, stolen from citizens of Chicago and sold without proper notice and due process,” says a lawsuit filed on behalf of Andrea Santiago, a Chicago motorist with multiple sclerosis whose van was taken off the street and sold for scrap. “While the city allegedly sends a notice of impoundment to the owner after it has already been impounded, it fails to send the required additional notice when the city intends on disposing of the vehicle. … While in some cases the city places a warning sticker on a vehicle that it considers abandoned, no such notice is mailed or otherwise actually delivered to the owner.” The lawsuit seeks class-action status for motorists in the same boat as Santiago. Santiago’s 1998 GMC Savana 1500 van was towed and impounded in June 2018 — and subsequently sold for scrap without prior notice — while parked outside Santiago’s home with a valid city sticker and a disability placard in the windshield, the lawsuit says. Source: chicago.suntimes.com.

Police Investigating Alleged Price Gouging

Police in Mobile, Alabama, said Tuesday there is enough evidence to launch a criminal investigation into an allegation of price gouging by some tow truck companies. “Taking advantage of a customer really is defeating the purpose of what we do, we serve the community,” said Greg Poole with Pitts & Sons Towing. “I believe it’s very good that they’re doing some investigation on that.” Police said this is not an isolated problem and have evidence against several companies the city works with for excessive and inappropriate charging and billing for services never rendered. “It did alarm us, it certainly brought our attention to some possible bad actors,” said James Barber, Mobile Public Safety Director. “We’re certainly not saying that all the wrecker companies are doing anything inappropriate.” Police said tow trucks that operate within Mobile must follow city ordinances relating to charges. Documents investigators have gotten show some companies may have charged as much as five times too much for some services. Investigations are ongoing which is why they have not named any towing companies. City leaders are also looking at changes to city ordinances that govern how tow trucks operate to prevent this from happening again. Source: fox10tv.com.


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Join American Towman Field Editor Terry Abejuela as he covers the important topic of “Roadside Safety.” He’ll discuss arriving at the scene safely, proper parking of the truck, proper use of emergency lighting and work lights, customer safety and avoiding the traffic side of the truck. Abejuela’s seminar will take place Thursday, August 15 at 3 p.m. during Tow Expo-Dallas at the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas. Register today! towexpodfw.com

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June 12 - June 18, 2019
A towman and another man were killed after being hit by a vehicle in Tucson, Arizona, Monday night. Authorities were still searching for the suspect as of press time. tucson.com image.

Towman Killed in Hit-and-Run

Authorities are searching for a driver who police say fatally struck two men and then fled the scene in Tucson, Arizona, Monday night.

One of the men, Richard “Rick” Struble, 57, worked for Luna’s Towing for more than 20 years. Owner Jesse Luna said Struble managed the business when he was on vacation.

“He was great,” a tearful Luna said. “He was reliable and honest and he was so conscientious about safety. He always put his vest on and he kept on the opposite side of traffic.”

According to Tucson police, a white or Hispanic man between 25 and 35 years old was traveling in a BMW at a high rate of speed around 10 p.m. The driver continued across six lanes and drove directly into a parking lot of Discount Tire. 

The vehicle, a 2001 BMW 740 iL, struck a tow truck, Struble and Ramon Murillo III, 32, as they were standing in the parking lot. Murillo died at the scene and Struble died shortly after arriving at Banner University Medical Center, TPD Sgt. Pete Dugan said.

Struble was helping Murillo with his vehicle when the collision occurred, Dugan said. 

Personnel from the Tucson police and Pima County Sheriff’s departments are searching for the driver of the vehicle who fled on foot from the scene.

Source: tuscon.com.

Tow Fees Set to [b]Consumer Price Index

The Austin (Texas) City Council responded last week to a request from local towing companies and the Austin Police Department to raise the fee for non-consent tows taking place in the city.

The vote sets the fee at $185 for tows initiated by the police in non-consent tows. It does not apply to non-consent tows taking place on privately owned property.

The fee for non-consent tows had been set at $150 since June 2006. Assistant Police Chief Justin Newsom told the council that “if you apply the consumer price index and the cost-of-living increase, in today’s dollars that would be $185.”

Because tow fee studies can only be requested every two years, Newsom said the department decided to request a jump to $195 to account for cost-of-living increases in the years ahead.

Council Member Greg Casar told Newsom that with the costs in the region being particularly high compared to large cities across the state, it makes better sense simply to keep track with increases to the CPI rather than jump ahead of it.

Casar drafted an amendment to the proposed ordinance to set the fee at $185. Setting the fee according to increases in CPI, he said, will give both staff and future Council members a stable method for future adjustments.

Tasha Mora, co-owner of A&A Wrecker and Recovery, said the exclusion of private property tows makes little sense considering that companies performing those tows played a major part in initiating the tow fee study last fall. In addition, she noted that the portion of city code that references the conditions of tow fee studies does not distinguish between non-consent tows conducted on or off private property.

Mora said the group of stakeholders she was representing supports either adopting the ordinance without the exclusion of non-consent private property tows or postponing the item until July to provide an opportunity to explain the situation from their perspective.

Casar motioned to pass the ordinance with his amendment and additional direction to APD to return as soon as possible to consider an increase to private property tow fees, likely in August or September.

Source: austinmonitor.com.

Towmen Rescue Driver [b]Stranded in Floodwaters

Two towmen, one of them a retired firefighter, say they were in the “right place at the right time” when they rescued a man trapped on top of his car in floodwaters early Saturday in Greensboro, North Carolina.
 
Danny Ward and Phillip Alston were driving back to their shop in the darkness of night when they suddenly encountered the emergency situation.
 
“We saw red lights in the distance,” said Alston. “We then saw the vehicle submerged underwater. A gentleman was down on all fours, just waving for help.”
 
The pair said it was clear he was in life-threatening danger and jumped into action. Alston had previously worked as a firefighter in Brunswick County with swift water rescue certifications and other training. 
  
One reason they chose to make the risky rescue: The man in danger was closer to the two truck drivers than the first responders on the other side of the water, said Ward and Alston.
 
The pair backed their tow truck as close to the water’s edge as they safely could. Then, they prepared their winch cable as a method to pull the man to dry land.
 
Ward next began to swim in the water toward the man stuck on his car roof.
 
“I had to swim at least 30 feet,” said Ward. “It was definitely deep.... it was extremely cold. It stunk, only thing I was worried about was trying to get that man to safety. Because the only think I could think of was that man has somebody at home.”
 
Once Ward reached the man with the winch cable, they were reeled back out of the water.
 
Source: wfmynews2.com.

Highway Named for Fallen Towman

A section of highway south of Greenville, Alabama, was officially named for a man who was killed there three years ago.

Gov. Kay Ivey signed the bill, which names Mile 123 in honor of Gene Schofield Jr., a towman who was hit and killed by a drunk driver on Interstate 65 near that location in 2016. The naming of the section of highway is just the latest in a series of safety bills introduced by Rep. Chris Sells and Anna Findley, Schofield’s sister, who has campaigned for safety laws since his death.

“Since the accident, we have been raising awareness for the Alabama Move Over law,” said Findley. “Last year, Chris Sells and I put together a bill, which would revise the Move Over law, adding ALDOT and stranded motorists to the law. Thankfully, it passed in 2018 and took effect on June 1, 2018.”

Sells said he was proud to have been the sponsor of the bills and pleased they passed.

“I’m humbled to be able to honor his memory with this resolution, and I look forward to continuing to strengthen the Alabama Move Over Law to raise awareness and prevent tragedies like this in the future,” he said.

Findley said the signs naming the highway could cost up to $5,000 and her group is currently working to raise funds. Those wishing to donate can do so via PayPal at annafindley.moveoverlaw@hotmail.com or the Go Fund Me page.

Source: greenvilleadvocate.com.

Beach Towing Gets Tougher

Mark Stewart, owner of ABC Towing, has seen plenty of changes over the last three decades towing in St. Augustine Beach, Florida. One thing that has always remained the same: drivers getting stuck on the beach.

“It’s every year like this. I have been doing this for 30 years and nothing is changing,” Stewart said.

But lately the number of calls he’s been getting from drivers spinning their wheels in the sand has been higher than usual. Michael Golubovich, beach services superintendent for St. Johns County, said the increased number of people getting stuck has a lot to do with the weather.

“The weather and the extreme sun and heat played into the soft sand conditions,” Golubovich said. “We haven’t seen significant swell events or significant rain, so the sand is extremely loose.”

The county took special precautions during Memorial Day Weekend due to the soft sand, but Golubovich said beach driving conditions are expected to improve following rain at the beach.

Ray Paytas, owner of Beachside Towing, said he’s stopped responding to calls from the beach all together.

“I don’t even go to the beach anymore,” Paytas said. “By the time I get out there, most of the time, they have been pulled out by some Good Samaritan with a big truck and they don’t even call to let me know.”

Stewart said he’s stopped responding to calls at the beach, too.

“It was more of a headache than anything,” Stewart said.

Source: staugustine.com.

Impound Sweep Surrounds [b]Mile High Stadium

It was a parade of tow trucks in Denver, Colorado, through residential neighborhoods near Mile High Stadium on Saturday. Around 60 drivers were ticketed and towed during a Garth Brooks concert.

The towed vehicles didn’t all belong to Garth Brooks fans parking illegally. Signs warn neighborhood parking is only for those with the proper identification. One man claimed to be a resident, but complained he hadn’t received a sticker yet.

But others in the neighborhood would like to see the towing more often. Matthew Lee says he only sees the tows during big events.

“During Broncos games and concerts, other than that nine of 10 cars are parked illegally, and they won’t do anything about it.”

Penalties are $50 for the ticket and $125 for the tow. That’s doubled if your car makes it to the city impound lot.

Source: denver.cbslocal.com.
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June 12 - June 18, 2019

Paver Saver

1 3aeccBy Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

James “Jamie” H. Dougherty Jr. is the president/CEO of Janeway Towing in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. In the world of towing, the name Jamie Dougherty is synonymous with heavy recovery. He was born to be a tower. In an interview some years back, Jane Dougherty, Jamie’s mother, the Jane in Janeway Towing, said he ate, slept and dreamt tow trucks since he was three years old. 

A lifetime tower, Jamie has garnered numerous accolades including be inducted into the Towman Order in 2008. Janeway Towing was established in 1980. Jamie and his crew, all certified WreckMasters, handle towing, transportation, and consulting and can recover anything and everything they are called to respond to.

So when a longtime customer called Janeway Towing, on June 2, 2019, to rescue a 40,000-lbs.-plus paver, Jamie was more than happy to respond. 

“This paver decided it wanted to ventilate it’s engine block while on the job,” Jamie said. “The owners of the equipment, Tony De Paul and Son have been one of our oldest and most loyal customers, almost 25 years, made the call to come rescue it.” 

Janeway was dispatched for a Caterpillar AP1055D that had blown an engine while working on a state contract paving streets in Delaware County. 

The information given from the company superintendent was that the machine weighed about 40,000 lbs. and that it would not be able to move under its own power. The company had initially requested a Landoll trailer to winch the unit up and haul it, but that suggestion was shot down due to the the paver’s width and high center of gravity. It actually weighed in at 45,130 lbs.

“The decision was made to utilize our Century 1075 75-ton rotator to lift the unit and place it on our Talbert 55-ton lowboy trailer being pulled by our 2010 Kenworth T800 wide hood heavy-haul tractor,” Jamie said.

Jamie responded along with operators Brian Bowe, Joe Rudnick and Rick Royles with Janeway’s 2009 Kenworth T800EC/Century 1075, the 2010 Kenworth T800WH tri-axle heavy-haul tractor pulling a 2016 Talbert 55-ton lowboy trailer and the 2019 Ford F-550/Zip’s service body (dispatched to the scene to provide support and specialized tools just in case).

Once on scene, the Swarthmore Police Department was contacted to shut down the roadway due to the fact that the rotator was going to block the travel lanes. With the road block set, the rotator was backed into position and set up for the lift.

“Due to the narrow road conditions the rotator was ‘short-jacked.’ There was a small tree in the way of the pick and several branches had to be cut from the tree,” said Jamie. “The paver was rigged via four endless loops to shackles and foundry hooks to lift the machine. The paver was lifted approximately four feet to clear the rear transom of the lowboy trailer, centered on the deck of the trailer and lowered onto the deck centered.”

Once on the trailer, it was secured via chain and binder and all DOT placards installed for transport. The Swarthmore PD escorted Janeway from the scene to I-476 NB for traffic control reasons on a busy Saturday afternoon. The unit was transported to Janeway Towing until the customer decided where the unit was going to be repaired.

Janeway received a call Monday stating that the unit was to go to DePaul’s Malvern facility for repairs. Arrangements were made to transport the unit there, including obtaining oversized load permits due to the fact the paver was more than 12’ wide.

“The unit was transported to Malvern. Once at the repair facility, a DePaul mechanic met us there and assisted in making the unit roll freely by bypassing the four propel pumps and releasing the hydraulic parking brake,” Jamie said. “The rotator was hooked up to the paver to tow it off of the trailer and around the building to be placed into the repair bay. Once the unit was in the repair bay, the trailer was hooked back up and all units returned to Janeway.

“The street was narrow and I had to short-jack the truck, but she did just fine. A special thanks goes to the Swarthmore Police Department for assisting Janeway Towing with traffic control and escorts.”

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Northbound & Down

0 2ec9cby Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

On May 21, 2019, I was driving a box truck and was stuck in what seemed like an endless line of traffic backed up on I-287 northbound. I was heading north to the New York Thruway.

As traffic slowly moved along, I could see the silhouette of the extended boom of a rotator and an overturned tractor-trailer on its side. The boom proudly stated Big Tow Inc.—a familiar sight on the roads of northern New Jersey and Orange County, New York.

As soon as I drove the box truck back to my buddy’s yard, I reached out for two of Big Tow’s operators and owner/SVP Monika Fijor.

Husband and wife Ricardo and Monika Fijor are the dynamic duo and driving force of Big Tows Inc., founded in 1998 in Spring Valley, New York. They have an additional location in Ramsey, New Jersey.

“The original call was for road service at the Pilot Truck Stop on Route 17 South in Mahwah, New Jersey,” Monika said. “The truck had an accelerator pedal issue and the driver was limping his truck into the truck stop. The second call was that the truck just took off and the driver could not gain control overturning around 287 mile marker 67 at the flyover ramp.”

Ricardo was the recovery supervisor and operated the 2018 Peterbilt 389 twin-steer/Century 75-ton rotator. Monika handled scene documentation and oversaw needed equipment. Their son Dylan provided manual labor with rigging, cleanup and organizing all rigging back to its location.

Heavy operator Jeremy Honey handled the 2015 Peterbilt 389/50-ton rotator; Louis Quintuna worked the 2017 Peterbilt 389/Vulcan V-100 50-ton heavy and the 2016 John Deere excavator G75; Kevin Shapirro handled the 2019 Hino flatbed and roll-off containers; Santiago Paunta operated the 2010 Freightliner Sprinter support vehicle and cut guardrails, fencing and pieces off the trailer to make it road worthy and safe for transport; Nikolas Bouzeas handled the excavator and the 2015 Bobcat skid-steer; and Josue Gonzales provided manual labor.

“The tractor-trailer overturned to its right side coming to a stop on its roof. The cargo was crates of 2-liter bottles of Coca-Cola,” Monika said. “The tractor sustained heavy damage to its roof and right side. There was no fuel leaked, only oil from engine. Fuel tanks were about half full.

“The trailer sidewall and roof blew out,” she said, “spilling cargo down into the embankment; most of the cargo exploded making a sweet, sticky and muddy recovery. The front corner of the trailer was the only part holding the trailer from continuing down the embankment.”

Ricardo boomed the 75-ton over the front and rigged the tractor only to separate it from trailer and upright. He also ran the drag winch to the tandems to hold the trailer from coming free and dropping down further. Honey parked the 50-ton in front of the tractor and rigged to upright.

Gonzalez worked and freed the jaws of the fifth-wheel. Quintuna and Paunta cut the guardrail and fence, used the excavator to pull posts and clear a path to recover the trailer. The tractor was lifted and uprighted with care to avoid further damage or fuel spill.

After it was uprighted, the tractor was prepared and transported back to Big Tows garage in Ramsey. With the tractor out of the way, Honey hooked the 50-ton up to the front of the trailer and Ricardo hooked the 75-ton up to the rear of the trailer. Working together, both wreckers brought the trailer back to the pavement to be uprighted.

After it was uprighted, the pieces hanging were cut off and the rest strapped and secured for transport back to their shop in Ramsey. The trailer was transported by Honey using his 50-ton rotator.

“The cargo was badly damaged, dirty with mud and more then 3/4 of the load exploded [or was] leaking,” Monika said. “We used two excavators to pick from the hill and put on roadway and the Bobcat to scoop and put into containers for disposal. Where excavators would not reach it took manual labor and muscle from our crew to pick up and put the load where excavators could transfer it to the roadway.”

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!

Submerged, Leaking in Massachusetts

0 a2b4bBy Jim “Buck” Sorrenti

Big Wheel Towing & Recovery in East Freetown, Mass., is one of the largest well-respected towing companies in New England. Bob Fouquette started his family business in 1980 and now has three generations actively working, including sons Eric and David.

On June 22, 2017 the Rochester Police called them to recover submerged in water.

“The driver of the tractor-trailer was trapped in the submerged cab and emergency personnel, as well as civilian passers-by, were attempting to extricate him,” Eric said. “They also stated that there was a substantial diesel fuel and oil leak into the water.”

The driver was removed by other first responders and flown to a hospital.

Bob, Eric and David, along with operators Frank Abbaticola, Nate Wing, Johnny DeOliveira and Jade Rodrigues, headed to the scene in a 2017 Kenworth/Jerr-Dan 60-ton rotator, 2016 Peterbilt/Century 1150 rolling rotator, 2001 International HAZMAT/recovery truck, Kubota skid-steer with power broom attachment and a 2012 Landoll tractor-trailer unit.

Upon impact with the steel guardrail, the front axle was ripped completely out from underneath the tractor; the fuel tank, hydraulic oil tank, radiator, and engine oil base pan were compromised.

“This waterway supplies water to the numerous cranberry bogs directly downstream,” Eric said. “Therefore, minimizing or stopping the flow of the contaminants completely was of utmost concern.”

Big Wheel’s crew placed several bags of absorbent pads and booms onto the water to begin soaking up the fluids and to create a dike where the runoff drain formed. Large sections of plywood were used to hold back the water from traveling into the river and the bogs until the tractor-trailer could be removed.

After they removed the guardrail, the rotator was able to lift the heavy front axle out from the water and place it onto a flatbed ramp truck.

Once the utility company cut the power and removed the power lines, Big Wheel diver Thomas Johnson entered the contaminated water to view the submerged tractor-trailer for rigging points. He found that the fifth wheel had broken off of the tractor’s frame, so the tractor and trailer were disconnected.

“It became clear that the most logical recovery method would be to recover the tractor and trailer separately from the water so that each could be dealt with on an individual basis,” Eric said.

The diver attached heavy chain bridles to the front and rear sections of the tractor’s frame. He then connected the rigging to the upper winch lines of both rotators and left the water.

In tandem, the rotators brought the submerged tractor out of the water. It was kept on its side so that the tanks could be drilled and pumped before it was completely uprighted to reduce the amount of hazardous fluids escaping into the water and onto the roadway. As the rotators held the elevated tractor in place, a containment pool was placed underneath the leaking tanks.

With the fluids siphoned, and both rotators uprighted, the tractor placed it onto Big Wheel’s Landoll where it was relocated on the scene.

Absorbent granules were spread and the Kubota sweeper worked the absorbent into the roadway to lift the contaminants from the pavement. The Kubota was then used to place Big Wheel’s specialized trailer dolly where it would be connected to the underside of the trailer. Both rotators were re-positioned on top of the bridge to begin the recovery of the loaded trailer.

Johnson re-entered the water and attached heavy-duty chain bridles to the underside of the trailer’s frame and attached to the upper winch lines.

Both rotator operators once again worked in tandem to lift and roll the loaded trailer onto its side and dumped the remainder of the stone into the water. The dump trailer was then uprighted and placed on the roadway.

The rotator in front detached all of its rigging from the trailer and pulled ahead in order to place the dolly underneath the trailer. The rotator in the rear held the trailer in place because one of the legs of the landing gear was ripped away. The Kubota maneuvered the dolly underneath the front of the trailer and locked it into place so that it could be safely transported.

Several large jersey barriers were trucked in. A rotator lifted and placed them in a line the entire length of the bridge to create a temporary guardrail system.

“Our final task was to lift a large steel plate with our rotator and place it in front of the run-off area to completely stop the flow of the contaminated water into the river and bogs. All of the contaminated absorbent pads and booms were collected and disposed of by the environmental company.”

(Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in the July 12, 2017, edition of Tow Industry Week.)

Show Yours @ TIW
Do you have a recovery to share with TIW readers? Send some pics and info to our Field Editor Jim “Buck” Sorrenti at jimchaos69@yahoo.com; your story may even be selected for print in American Towman magazine!
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City, State
RATES

Pelham, NH
$125
(Pop. 10,914)

Pell City, AL
$295
(Pop. 12,695)

Plymouth, IN
$140
(Pop. 10,033)

Centralia, WA
$178
(Pop. 16,336)

Light-Duty nonconsensual tow rates as provided by Police Towers of America.
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June 12 - June 18, 2019

Employee Discipline Investigations

employeeform d6be2By Brian J. Riker

In previous articles, I have written about the need to document both discipline and good conduct in your employee files. I recently discovered that many employers don’t know how to properly investigate misconduct by their employees, causing some minor incidents to be blown out of proportion. Following are some tips to properly investigate incidents.

The time to think about accident or incident investigation is before you need to conduct one! Start with creating simple checklists or procedure guides for the typical events that reoccur often, such as workplace injury, motor vehicle accidents and damage claims. I suggest developing a fill-in-the-blanks type of form and guidelines for including photographs.

Other incidents, such as employee misconduct are not as simple to investigate; however, the processes and fundamentals are the same. It is paramount, regardless of the type of event you are investigating, to be fair and unbiased while collecting evidence and establishing conclusions.

All investigations, big or small, must be thoroughly documented in writing. Both hard copies and digital copies are recommended of all reports, photos, videos and other evidence. In many cases these documents will become part of your OSHA, DOT or other agency-required recordkeeping.

Open an investigation as soon as you become aware of possible misconduct, incident or injury. Time destroys evidence; memories fade and stories change. It is paramount that a formal collection of facts begins as soon as possible. Document everything.

Don’t allow who you are investigating, or why, color your perception. All incidents—whether a physical injury, property damage or alleged company policy violation—deserve a thorough and fair investigation.

Be thorough but kind during the investigation. No one likes being investigated. It may be discovered that the allegations are untrue, or injury is not their fault. If you come across as unkind or lacking empathy—and the investigation turns up no wrongdoing—you may have damaged the future business relationship with the accused beyond repair.

Incidents that have resulted in personal injury, or other risk exposure, may require temporary protective measures to be put into place immediately, even while the investigation is still on-going. These measures may be as simple as barricading off the affected area, removing employees from the task or suspending the alleged offender until the investigation is concluded.

While I am not suggesting you wholesale discount disgruntled customers or co-workers, these allegations must be reviewed carefully. They warrant more attention, as there may be company culture or other factors in play that can affect your long-term success. Whenever personal motives or fraud may come into play, an event needs special attention.

It is paramount when conducting interviews of witnesses to let them speak their mind without interrupting … just take notes. You will have your chance to ask questions for clarity after they have spoken, and you should be prepared to ask the same thing in several different ways to see if the story or facts change. Guilty people will often paint themselves into a corner if simply given the chance to speak freely; all you need to do is listen carefully, take notes and give them gentle encouragement to continue speaking.

Consider the context of what is being asked and answered. It is easy to ask if Joe did or said something, but often without the full picture their actions can be misconstrued.

Eyewitness accounts are often the most unreliable, especially when interviewed days or weeks after an event. Our minds have a way of shaping memories into what we want them to be, not always capturing a true record of events.

Review the physical evidence, such as damage to property, pictures or video recordings. Often our recollection of events we have witnessed is distorted by our own point of view; however a video has no such prejudice. That said, even a video recording does not always show the entire picture, so take into account the angle, clarity and source of the video or photographic evidence.

Seek outside council on high-impact incidents: those with the potential for large settlements, bad publicity or serious personal injury. It is best to have additional eyes on these investigations, especially if you may be emotionally attached to the outcome of the investigation.

Bottom line: investigate even the minor incidents thoroughly and develop procedures to prevent recurrences of all incidents. The purpose of an investigation is two-fold … assign responsibility and prevent future damages or injury. This cannot be accomplished without fair and complete reviews of all incidents.

Are You Using Chock Blocks?

Areyouusingchockblocks f9985By Randall C. Resch

Two East Coast carrier operators were injured in an industrial accident that was preventable and happened only because one simple safety item wasn’t deployed.

A tow company owner was assisting one of his operators with loading a car onto a 23-year-old carrier. As the owner was allegedly standing on the carrier’s tilted bed, the carrier unexpectedly began to roll. The other operator gave chase and attempted to jump into the carrier’s cab with intentions to stop it, but slipped, fell to the ground and was run over. The owner fell off the deck and sustained substantial injuries.

Luckily, the carrier crashed into a tree and didn’t cause additional injury or death. Both towers were transported to an area hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

In the November 2017 issue of American Towman Magazine, I covered the topic of chock-block safety. I wrote the article after a series of tow operator injuries and as many as 10 tow operators were killed when the vehicle’s they were preparing to load or offload rolled away unexpectedly.

Each scenario had a common factor: chock blocks weren’t used.

As in the opening scenario, it’s presumed that the truck’s emergency brake failed to hold the carrier in place. What I found interesting was there was no indication that chock blocks or wooden blocks were installed as part of this carrier’s loading process.

The Obvious Reason

Chocking tires isn’t a new process, but one that proves to provide an additional level of safety when used. In my 2017 article I suggested these 10 easy-to-remember recommendations for employing chock blocks:

Every tow truck in the fleet should have a pair of chocks.

Owners should demand that chocks are used on every load/unload.

Check the truck’s E-brake daily; ensure it holds on an incline.

Ensure the truck’s transmission is in park or appropriate gear before exiting the vehicle, especially when some transmissions don’t have parking gears.

Always engage the truck’s emergency brake before exiting.

Never trust the hold ability of an E-brake when parked on inclines.

Chocks applied on downward slopes are marginally effective.

When parked near curb-lines when loading vehicles, turn the truck’s steering hard-lock (toward the curb).

Always chock tires before working beneath vehicles.

10. Never attempt to stop a rolling, runaway vehicle.

Ours is an industry where things happen … wouldn’t you agree? To the level of extreme danger and frequency that accidents occur, it’s necessary that towers pre-anticipate the possibility of a runaway tow truck or carrier as part of a load or recovery process.

Chock blocks are only as good as their application. For around $30, tow trucks and carriers can be outfitted with a pair of rubber chocks (in triangular shape). Their shape and non-skid design add a higher level of safety for incline loading.

I personally train my operators to not to load on extremely steep inclines while parked facing downhill. If a vehicle must be loaded on an inclined street, I recommend facing the tow truck uphill. While roll-away occurs from either direction, if a carrier is parked uphill and starts to roll away, it may roll backwards into the customer’s vehicle which should still be in park and it’s E-brake on. Sure, it’s likely to be damaged; but it may prevent roll-away. If the tow truck’s tires are turned hard-lock and not straight, it won’t roll-away in a straight line, only to gain momentum as it rolls.

These recommendations are guidelines hoping you to choose a safer practice of keeping your tow trucks in place during load or recovery operations. Chock blocks are only as good when they’re employed to the towing/load scenario at hand.

Randall Resch is American Towman's and Tow Industry Week’s Operations Editor, a former California police officer, tow business owner and retired civilian off-road instructor for Navy Special Warfare. Randall is an approved instructor for towers serving the California Highway Patrol's rotation contract. His course is approved by the California law enforcement community. He has written over 500 industry-related articles for print and on-line, is a member of the International Towing & Recovery Hall of Fame, and, a recipient of the 2017 Dave Jones Leadership Award.

School's Out!

51a993ec2625b.image b9184By Brian J Riker


It is that time of year when thoughts drift to family vacations, warm breezes and wanderlust sets in. Excellent conditions for towers to make some money; after all, we know tourists are often not focused on the condition of their automobile or the suitability of the route their GPS navigation system suggests.

With the increase in tourists and travelers passing through, the risk of crashes increase—again good for business—if your truck is not involved in the crash!

I suggest paying close attention for out-of-state license plates, vehicles with extra luggage or entire families as well as those that are making erratic or unusual moves in traffic. Tourists are usually unfamiliar with your area and may be distracted by their family or even fatigued from attempting to drive longer than they usually do.

With the warmer weather also comes more children. As schools begin to recess for summer break, children too fill their heads with thoughts of recreation and easily lose focus on the hazards surrounding them. Perhaps you take advantage of this break in the school schedule to bring your own children along with you in the truck for some bonding time.

When there are children around, it is more important than ever that we be aware of what they are doing and where they are doing it. Kids love trucks and do not have fully developed danger mechanisms, so they don’t think twice about climbing in, on or under trucks that they may find interesting.

This makes it especially important to always conduct a circle check every time you move your vehicle.

Children and pets have been killed because they were under a vehicle that was placed in motion without the operator knowing. I have made it a habit to approach any vehicle I am driving from the passenger side, walking a complete 360-degree circle around it before entering the driver’s seat.

Another old maxim I recall each summer is, “Behind each bouncing ball comes a running child.” Keep a close eye between vehicles for kids that may be hidden from your view and unaware that you are driving nearby.

For the heavy-duty operators, summertime also means more ride-alongs in big rigs and extra children in truck stops. These kids are already familiar with big trucks and may be even more curious about your tow truck, so use extra caution when driving through truck stop parking lots.

Now is also a great time to assess the health of your truck. Pay particular attention to the tires, as the temperature difference will cause inflation to change and require adjustment. Inspect the cooling system, give the radiator fins a good cleaning and make sure you have extra water onboard. Not just water for the cooling system; but also drinking water to keep yourself and your customers hydrated.

Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are very real possibilities and you must take precautions to protect yourself. These conditions occur when the body loses the ability to regulate its internal temperature and can happen even in relatively mild conditions if you are in new area and not yet adjusted to the climate.

Summer means longer days, warmer weather and perhaps some well-deserved recreation. With this change in the seasons we must not lose focus on our safety or that of the general public. Enjoy some time off, but please stay safe: tragedy doesn’t stop because you are on vacation.

Brian J Riker is a third generation towman and President of Fleet Compliance Solutions, LLC. He specializes in helping non-traditional fleets such as towing, repossession, and construction companies navigate the complex world of Federal and State transportation regulatory compliance. With 25 years of experience in the ditch as a tow operator Brian truly understands the unique needs and challenges faced by towing companies today. He can be reached at brian.riker@fleetcompliancesolutions.net
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June 12 - June 18, 2019

A Ride on the Wild Side

0 e8eefBy George L. Nitti

Jinks Motor Carriers Towing and Recovery of Midlothian, Virginia, has set itself apart with an attention-grabbing graphic design. The company, owned by Alexander “Mr. Jinks” Jinks, recently celebrated its third anniversary and is set to purchase its fourth unit.

It was the first acquisition—a 2016 RAM 5500 Laramie with a CM Truck Beds’ ER model wrecker body/Lift and Tow Z Series wheel-lift—that set the graphics bar to a new standard.

“It was a marketing strategy,” Jinks said. “I wanted people to remember us and say that ‘we want that cool tow truck.’ ”

This unit clearly is unforgettable!

The design was executed by Illusion Wraps of Fredericksburg and came directly out of 25-year-old Jinks’ imagination.

“It was all in my head. I had a vision and saw the future,” Jinks said. “I picked something and drew it.”

The white logo on the side of the truck, highlighting the company name, screams out like a wild, dancing flame, written in a tightly scripted font that stretches from top to bottom. The logo is also found on the center of the hood.

“I have big dreams. We’re trademarking our logo,” Jinks said.

The rest of the unit is a patriotic tribute, with red, white and blue lines and stars enveloping the design, crisscrossing here and there and exploding in bright candy colors.

The vibrant, busy design takes viewers on a ride to the wild side.

Like their first wrap, their second wrap on their 2019 Freightliner M2/Jerr-Dan 22’ XLP bed was done in a similar, extraordinary vein.

In the competitive marketplace, Jinks said, “I had to do something competitive to set us apart. That’s why we spent so much money on our vinyl wraps. They are elaborate and beautiful.”

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!

Branding with a Bulldog

0 f3544George L. Nitti

When Mark Lopez, owner of Bulldog Towing of San Diego, California, started the company six years ago, branding was a paramount issue.

“We decided to do a bulldog for the sake of branding,” Lopez said. “A lot of tow companies use people’s names like ‘Bob’s Towing,’ and I don’t believe people identify with that. We wanted a brand.”

With the help of a family friend, a design was created. It would become the logo and brand recognition that Lopez and partner Caesar Esparza sought.

On the hood and side doors of their 2019 Kenworth W900/Custom Built 50-ton wrecker is the striking, stand-out image of a muscular bulldog, done in an Old English style.

“Obviously it is a favorite of ours,” Lopez said. “We are big fans of bulldogs. Bulldogs are hardheaded and stick with things. So do we.”

Complementing the bulldog throughout the wrecker is a military tribute theme. Two of the owners are ex-military, a couple of the tow operators are former marines and one of the office employees is an army vet.

“As part of the wrap,” Lopez said, “we incorporated the American flag along with camouflage. We are supporters of Wounded Warriors, which you will also find on the truck.”

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!

A Mantra with Clean, Crisp Decaling

sada1 fde5fBy George L. Nitti

In determining a truck’s graphic design, one critical consideration is the method of design: to use decals, a wrap or custom paint. Custom paint is often the highest priced, while wraps also can be a major expense. Many tow companies choose decals and vinyl vehicle letters because they are the most cost-effective and easiest to apply.

When Sadashiv Autotech & Collision of Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, purchased their 2019 Ford F-550/Jerr-Dan MPL-40, a number of clean, crisp decals would become the basis of their design, focused around themes such as God, country and Move Over.

The company name, “Sadashiv,” is a clear focus of the truck, with its silver-patterned lettering and clean, green shadows standing out. The lettering is applied diagonally, spanning across the side of the unit.

The name “Sadashiv” is connected to Hinduism, as “Shiva” means “God” and “Sada” means “all.”

“I always did my business in God’s name,” said owner Victor Rampal, who is from Punjab, India. “I’m not a religious person, but I believe in this God.”

A powerful, single image of “Om,” shaped like the number 3, is found on the hood and also builds on Hinduism. Om is a mystic syllable, considered the most sacred mantra in Hinduism and Tibetan Buddhism.

“Christians have a cross. Hindus have Om,” said Rampal.

Rampal, a mechanic in business for more than 24 years, added the tow business just over a year ago, quickly growing to three units.

“I started it in order to bring more business to the shop,” Rampal said. “I am a cancer survivor and a heart patient.”

On the back of the cab, more images highlight company values: the American flag and the Move Over symbols.

“People say it’s a nice truck,” Rampal said. “That it’s a beautiful truck.”

Brag @ TIW! Should your truck be featured here? Send a few pics and your contact information to the editor at bdooley@towman.com. You might even be selected to go in print, too, in American Towman magazine!
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June 12 - June 18, 2019

Felling Updates Tilt-Deck Design

499NTU cacc0Felling Trailers recently released its updated IT-I Series model line of tilt trailers (FT-16 IT-I pictured). The revamped design incorporates additional standard features and structural strength. Specs include:

redesigned hitch area with integrated nose plate; cylinder lugs for additional structural integrity for cylinder cross-members; new lighting includes dual stop/turn/taillights located on the rear of the fenders; new tie-down placement on the side of the of the trailer bed; D-ring location is at the widest point of the deck for easier securing of equipment; operator-friendly tilt-deck latch.

felling.com

VTS Cloud Classic

VTS.Systems 41204VTS Cloud Classic is designed to provide the features needed to comprehensively operate any towing and VSF company, regardless of size, with as needed add-on expansion modules. The program includes customer profiling, digital dispatch, coverage for multiple storage lots and more. VTS Cloud Classic offers as an optional package add-on fully integrated, electronic DMV/MVR access to 36 states online.

vts-systems.com
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June 12 - June 18, 2019
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June 12 - June 18, 2019
KAR Auction Services and Insurance Auto Auctions will officially split as of June 28. IAA-auctions.com image.

KAR, IAA Officially Split

Insurance Auto Auctions was projected officially to be an independent, publicly traded company as of June 28.

Former parent company KAR Auction Services said once the distribution was complete, IAA would begin trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the “IAA” ticker, and KAR will have no ownership in the salvage auction company.

“It is with great pleasure that we announce this important step toward completing the separation of IAA from KAR Auction Services and launch the future of two companies,” KAR chairman/CEO Jim Hallett said in a news release.

“Following the separation, KAR will concentrate its focus on its whole car auction marketplaces and technology solutions serving OEMs, captive financing companies, vehicle lending institutions, fleets, and franchise and independent car dealers,” he said. 

“As part of KAR, we have been a leading provider of auction solutions for total loss, damaged and low-value vehicles, and we look forward to building upon that legacy,” said IAA CEO John Kett.

The spin-off was first announced in late February 2018. Both KAR and IAA had “grown to levels that will allow them to succeed independently,” Hallett said.

Source: autoremarketing.com.

Repo Agent Claims ‘Wrongful’ Arrest

A New York man claims he was just trying to do his job when he was wrongfully arrested late last month. According to NY1, Jose Rodriguez says he approached a car that had been marked for repossession due to missed payments.

A short time later, he was confronted by an off-duty NYPD sergeant who informed him the Nissan Maxima belonged to a fellow officer.

The car’s owner subsequently emerged and attempted to pay what was due on the auto loan, Rodriguez said, adding that he told the man he could not reverse a repossession once it had started.

In response, he said he was arrested on suspicion of a felony auto theft count. The officers then allegedly removed the sedan from the tow truck and drove it away.

After spending nearly an entire day behind bars, reports indicate the felony was downgraded to misdemeanor counts of falsifying documents and possessing police scanners.

Nevertheless, Rodriguez maintains he is innocent of all the charges and was only arrested because he attempted to take a police officer’s vehicle. His supervisor agrees that he was wrongfully arrested and the respossession was legal, through the bank with a court order.

As of press time, Rodriguez said his truck was still being held in an impound lot and he had not yet received property including a phone, tablet, camera and computer taken at the time of his arrest. He is reportedly considering a lawsuit against the New York Police Department.

Source: crimeonline.com.

More Settlement Money [b]from Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo has agreed to a second round of payments to more than 400 members of the military whose personal vehicles the banking giant repossessed while they were on active duty.

Each service member victimized by the bank will receive $12,300 from a $5 million-plus settlement fund Wells Fargo has agreed to set up. The settlement resolves a federal class action lawsuit filed in Topeka, Kansas, in 2017 by Jin Nakamura, a soldier stationed at Fort Riley.

In agreeing to resolve the case, Wells Fargo denied the allegations and said in a statement that it settled “to avoid the distraction of burdensome and protracted litigation.”

Julie Fogerson, a spokeswoman for Wells Fargo, said the agreement “is a step forward in making things right for customers and we remain deeply focused on caring for our neighbors, family members and team members who serve our country.”

An attorney for Nakamura did not respond to comment.

Wells Fargo had previously agreed to pay the same individuals $10,000 each. Those payments came under an order by the U.S. Department of Justice and federal banking regulators to which Wells Fargo consented in 2016.

Wells Fargo, the country’s fourth largest bank, has been stained by a series of consumer scandals. The bank has agreed to more than $2 billion in settlements and government orders stemming from various complaints, including claims it opened millions of unauthorized accounts, added customers to its online banking service without their knowledge, required customers to buy unneeded car insurance and charged them excessive fees to lock in mortgage loan rates.

In the Nakamura case, Wells Fargo repossessed his car even though Nakamura had set up automatic payments for the vehicle, according to his lawsuit. By the time he figured out what was happening, the car had been sold along with some military gear he’d stowed in the vehicle.

As the lead plaintiff, Nakamura will receive a bigger payment than the other members of the class. The case required him to make two trips from his duty station in South Korea.

Court documents make it clear that payments under the settlement will be in addition to money service members were eligible to receive under the earlier government case.

Federal investigators had responded to a North Carolina man’s complaint after Wells Fargo repossessed his used car just as he was deploying to Afghanistan in 2015. Investigators were able to corroborate the Army National Guardsman’s complaint and found “a pattern of unlawful repossessions spanning over more than seven years,” according to a Department of Justice statement.

Source: kcur.org.

Repo Agents Honored by [b]PAR North America

PAR North America, a division of KAR Auction Services, handed out its Agent of the Year and LPR Agent of the Year, Resolution Champion and Compliance Champion, Regional Choice and other award winners during its 2019 PAR Agent Event in Indianapolis, Indiana, in May.

According to a news release, a total of 17 award winners received honors. Agent of the Year honors went to S.C.A.R., while Associates Asset Recovery was recognized as LPR Agent of the Year. Skip Agent of the Year honors went to Specialized Towing and Absolute Recovery Services ran off with the Rookie of the Year award.

Also, PAR and its recovery agent partners raised more than $42,000 for the Recovery Agents Benefit Fund, which grants funds to member agents in times of tragedy.

“I’m overwhelmed by the generosity of all our sponsors and partners who made this event a reality,” PAR recovery services manager Jonathan Armstrong said.

“It’s a great feeling to be able to give back to an organization whose sole purpose is to help those in our repo family,” Armstrong added.

Source: autoremarketing.com.
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